Northern News
CBC North

Coroner's inquest looks at surveillance video on night of woman's death at Whitehorse emergency shelter

The death of Josephine Hager was the focus of the coroner's inquest on Thursday. The inquest is looking into the deaths of four Indigenous women at the Whitehorse emergency shelter in 2022 and 2023. ...
More ...A person walks in front of the doors of a Whitehorse shelter.

The death of Josephine Hager was the focus of the coroner's inquest on Thursday. The inquest is looking into the deaths of four Indigenous women at the Whitehorse emergency shelter in 2022 and 2023.

25 minutes ago

CBC North

Long term care facility for Watson Lake still being explored, says Yukon minister

Yukon's health minister says the idea of a long term care facility in Watson Lake is "still being explored," and that she's also willing to consider options for spouses to stay with their loved ones  ...
More ...A woman with glasses speaking at a microphone, in front of two flags.

Yukon's health minister says the idea of a long term care facility in Watson Lake is "still being explored," and that she's also willing to consider options for spouses to stay with their loved ones in long term care. 

2 hours ago

Nunatsiaq News

Tuberculosis screening clinic coming to Naujaat

With tuberculosis rates rising in Naujaat, a community-wide prevention and screening clinic is scheduled to open next week in the hamlet of approximately 1,230 people. Starting April 15 and running un ...
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With tuberculosis rates rising in Naujaat, a community-wide prevention and screening clinic is scheduled to open next week in the hamlet of approximately 1,230 people.

Starting April 15 and running until the end of May, screenings will be held at the Naujaat hamlet building. Community members will be contacted by household to schedule appointments, according to a Health Department news release.

Tuberculosis is an airborne bacterial infection that most commonly affects the lungs, and can be spread when an infected person sneezes or coughs.

The illness can cause symptoms coughing, chest pain, fever, and weight loss.

The screening process will initially involve a questionnaire, a TB test and chest X-ray. Further testing could involve a blood test or providing a sputum, or phlegm, sample.

Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. is partnering with the Health Department to operate the clinic.

“The rates of TB in Nunavut are already much higher than the rest of Canada because of overcrowded homes and difficulties in accessing health-care services,” said Paul Irngaut, vice-president of NTI, in the news release.

He added, “We can all do our part to stop the spread of TB so one day soon we can eliminate this curable and preventable disease from Nunavut.”

Health Minister John Main, in the release, said “early detection is key to eliminating TB from our communities.”

A TB outbreak was declared in Naujaat in May 2023. A spokesperson for the Health Department could not be reached to confirm if the outbreak remains in place or to say how many cases there are currently in the community.

Naujaat is the fifth community in the past five years to host a community-wide screening clinic, after Pangnirtung, Whale Cove, Qikiqtarjuaq and Kinngait.

3 hours ago

Nunatsiaq News

Johannes Rivoire dead at 93

Rev. Johannes Rivoire, a former Nunavut priest accused of sexually abusing multiple Inuit children, has died. Rev. Ken Thorson, the head of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate order headquartered in Ottaw ...
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Rev. Johannes Rivoire, a former Nunavut priest accused of sexually abusing multiple Inuit children, has died.

Rev. Ken Thorson, the head of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate order headquartered in Ottawa, confirmed in an email that Rivoire died Thursday after a long, unspecified illness.

The 93-year-old spent more than 30 years working as a priest in several Nunavut communities. He left Canada for his home country of France in 1993, around the time RCMP began investigating allegations against him.

The first three charges were laid against Rivoire in 1998. Challenges with extradition led the Crown to stay those charges in 2017.

One new charge of historical indecent assault was laid against Rivoire in 2022.

Rivoire never returned to Canada to face these charges, despite attempts by several groups to get him to do so.

“We recognize that this news will be difficult for many to receive, especially for the survivors and their families who advocated for him to face justice in Canada,” Thorson said in the email.

“We sincerely regret that despite all their efforts, Rivoire never made himself available and will never face the charges that were laid against him. We further regret that efforts for him to be formally removed as a priest were unsuccessful.”

More to come…

 

 

5 hours ago

Nunatsiaq News

Elders show off their skills in garbage bag parka competition

Iqaluit elders showed off their parkas Thursday, but there was something unusual about these garments: they were made out of plastic. Elisapee Sanpudlat walks with her blue and white garbage bag parka ...
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Iqaluit elders showed off their parkas Thursday, but there was something unusual about these garments: they were made out of plastic.

Elisapee Sanpudlat walks with her blue and white garbage bag parka. (Photo courtesy of Victoria Coman)

The garbage bag fashion show, an annual Toonik Tyme event, packed the Elders Qammaq with vamping contestants and cheering spectators alike, with judges deciding the winners.

Annie Demcheso came in first and won a fur as a result. Her design was an orange amauti, which she said was inspired by the amautis her mother and grandmother wore.

Second place went to Elisapee Sanpudlat with a blue and white garbage bag parka while Geesapee Kanayok came in third with an orange creation.

Kanayok said she didn’t expect to see the Qammaq as full as it was when it was her turn to take on the catwalk.

“It’s fun,” she said.

“Next year I plan to participate again if I’m up and well.”

Elders started making their parkas on Monday. This was a change from last year, where the contestants had one day to create their parkas, Kanayok said.

Making clothes out of garbage bags creates a unique set of challenges, said Demcheso. She said it’s important to be mindful of the tape because of how sticky it is, but the cutting is easy because the plastic is soft.

“You really have to be thinking about the material,” she said.

Sanpudlat said her plastic boot nearly came off because it was not secured well enough with the Scotch tape she used.

Geesapee Kanayok is all smiles in her orange garbage bag parka. She took part in the elders garbage bag parka competition Thursday, an annual Toonik Tyme event. (Photo by David Lochead)

Moatee Maatiusi, who works at the Elders Qammaq as a supervisor, praised the effort the elders put in to make their garbage bag parkas.

“It was awesome,” Maatiusi said.

“They’re very creative.”

Victoria Coman, the City of Iqaluit’s special events planner, was also there to take in the show.

“I’m honestly surprised at how well [the parkas] looked, considering they are garbage bags,” she said.

Coman said Demcheso taught her how to sew when she was in middle school.

Next year the plan is to bring out sewing machines and make actual parkas.

 

8 hours ago

Nunatsiaq News

Iqaluit’s proposed community safety plan focuses on mental health, access to food

A proposed new public safety plan for Iqaluit prioritizes addressing mental health and addiction issues and improving food security, among other areas. The city’s human resources director Rod Mu ...
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A proposed new public safety plan for Iqaluit prioritizes addressing mental health and addiction issues and improving food security, among other areas.

The city’s human resources director Rod Mugford presented the Iqaluit Community Safety Plan at the city’s public safety committee meeting Thursday, its first in nearly two years.

On mental health and addictions, the plan cites a “need for accessible and comprehensive mental health services to support individuals in crisis and prevent further escalation of these situations.”

It says “strengthening access to mental health services, supports and training, providing early intervention programs, and promoting mental well-being are critical components of a crime prevention approach.”

To ensure community members have access to safe and reliable food sources, one option highlighted includes working with hunters’ organizations.

To improve a feeling of community inclusion among youth, the plan emphasizes creating an environment for young people where they “feel safe, engaged, and connected.”

“Through culturally grounded programming, we seek to provide them with opportunities for growth, learning, and positive experiences,” the plan says.

Coun. Amber Aglukark, who chairs the committee, emphasized the need to collaborate with community members as this proposed plan is implemented.

Deputy Mayor Kim Smith said the city would need to work with other levels of government to implement the plan. She also asked why the plan did not include anything about safety issues caused by the community’s many loose dogs.

Mugford said the plan will serve as a “building block” to address other safety issues in the community, even if they were not specifically mentioned in the plan.

“We have plans beyond this initial plan,” Mugford said. “Definitely, that will be a part of our community safety plan.”

The 17-member committee — which includes three city councillors as well as city staff and several members at large — voted unanimously to move the community safety plan to be heard by city council at a future meeting.

9 hours ago

Cabin Radio

NWT launches fentanyl test strips in response to drug poisonings

The NWT began a pilot project offering people test strips that help them check drugs for fentanyl. Some experts called the move a step in the right direction. The post NWT launches fentanyl test strip ...
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The NWT began a pilot project offering people test strips that help them check drugs for fentanyl. Some experts called the move a step in the right direction.

The post NWT launches fentanyl test strips in response to drug poisonings first appeared on Cabin Radio.

9 hours ago

Cabin Radio

Atco boss criticizes GNWT over Hay River power franchise loss

Nancy Southern hit out at the GNWT over Atco's loss of the Hay River power franchise as she announced subsidiary Northland Utilities will be renamed Naka Power. The post Atco boss criticizes GNWT over ...
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Nancy Southern hit out at the GNWT over Atco's loss of the Hay River power franchise as she announced subsidiary Northland Utilities will be renamed Naka Power.

The post Atco boss criticizes GNWT over Hay River power franchise loss first appeared on Cabin Radio.

10 hours ago

Cabin Radio

Heating oil spill hits residential Yellowknife street

A fuel truck spilled heating oil into the spring run-off on a Yellowknife road. Some residents say the response was inadequate. A nearby lake may be affected. The post Heating oil spill hits residenti ...
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A fuel truck spilled heating oil into the spring run-off on a Yellowknife road. Some residents say the response was inadequate. A nearby lake may be affected.

The post Heating oil spill hits residential Yellowknife street first appeared on Cabin Radio.

10 hours ago

Cabin Radio

Ottawa says it’ll create $500-million youth mental health fund

The federal budget commits half a billion dollars to youth mental health, a key concern in the North. How that money would be accessed isn't yet clear. The post Ottawa says it’ll create $500-million ...
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The federal budget commits half a billion dollars to youth mental health, a key concern in the North. How that money would be accessed isn't yet clear.

The post Ottawa says it’ll create $500-million youth mental health fund first appeared on Cabin Radio.

10 hours ago

CBC North

Q+A | Decorated N.W.T. speed skater Wren Acorn hangs up her skates

Wren Acorn, who grew up in Yellowknife, spent years competing on the national circuit and was a member of Team Canada. She spoke to CBC about her decision to retire from competitive skating and face ...
More ...A woman speed skates on ice outside, learning down and looking right into the camera.

Wren Acorn, who grew up in Yellowknife, spent years competing on the national circuit and was a member of Team Canada. She spoke to CBC about her decision to retire from competitive skating and face some new challenges.

21 hours ago

Cabin Radio

Unhoused Indigenous women ‘overpoliced, underprotected’ in YK

A new report from the Yellowknife Women's Society says urgent action is needed to address the policing of unhoused Indigenous women in the city. The post Unhoused Indigenous women ‘overpoliced, unde ...
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A new report from the Yellowknife Women's Society says urgent action is needed to address the policing of unhoused Indigenous women in the city.

The post Unhoused Indigenous women ‘overpoliced, underprotected’ in YK first appeared on Cabin Radio.

22 hours ago

CBC North

Raven ReCentre announces plan to cut recycling services in Whitehorse

Raven ReCentre says that as of September, its recycling depot in Whitehorse will not accept paper, plastic or tin. The organization says it's up to the City of Whitehorse to ensure material does not e ...
More ...A pile of cardboard is seen through an opening with a sign marked, 'mixed paper.'

Raven ReCentre says that as of September, its recycling depot in Whitehorse will not accept paper, plastic or tin. The organization says it's up to the City of Whitehorse to ensure material does not end up in the landfill.

22 hours ago

Cabin Radio

What MLAs heard about Missing Persons Act in Aklavik and Inuvik

Residents of Inuvik and Aklavik, the home community of missing Frank Gruben, gathered to provide feedback on a Missing Persons Act the NWT hopes to introduce. The post What MLAs heard about Missing Pe ...
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Residents of Inuvik and Aklavik, the home community of missing Frank Gruben, gathered to provide feedback on a Missing Persons Act the NWT hopes to introduce.

The post What MLAs heard about Missing Persons Act in Aklavik and Inuvik first appeared on Cabin Radio.

11 Apr 2024 21:53:58

Nunatsiaq News

We should all be talking about online abuse: Mary Simon

Gov. Gen. Mary Simon is making it a mission to stand up to online abuse, and to help others do the same. That was the aim of the Governor General’s Symposium: Building a Safe and Respectful Digital ...
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Gov. Gen. Mary Simon is making it a mission to stand up to online abuse, and to help others do the same.

That was the aim of the Governor General’s Symposium: Building a Safe and Respectful Digital World, a one-day event Simon hosted at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Thursday.

The discussion brought together individuals from across the country who have been hurt by online abuse. The goal was to raise awareness of the problem, and encourage people to collaborate to make the digital world safer.

The day was spurred by Simon’s own experiences with online abuse and harassment she received after she became Canada’s first Indigenous governor general in 2021.

“They weren’t directed at the office, really, they were directed at me as a visible person, as a woman and an Indigenous person,” she said of the comments she read on her social media accounts.

“Public life is not easy as it is, but with that [abuse] added to it it becomes very heavy,” Simon said, speaking with journalist Lisa LaFlamme to open the event. 

“The impact of social media can’t be minimized.”

2SLGBTQ+ activist Fae Johnstone discusses online abuse and building digital safety at the symposium Building a Safe and Respectful Digital World at Rideau Hall on Thursday. (Photo by Madalyn Howitt)

LaFlamme, herself the target of online hate campaigns, revealed that she too read messages that went beyond just criticizing her work as a reporter.

“Everything from ‘you’re an old hag’ to ‘you deserve to die,’” she said.

“Honestly, when you receive a detailed, graphic plan for your death, it really does frighten the hell out of you.”

Simon said in her situation, she struggled to know what to do, especially as the increasingly negative harassment started to affect her family and staff.

“At one point, I felt I should just walk from it, just pretend it wasn’t happening,” she said.

Instead, knowing she wasn’t the only public person experiencing online abuse compelled her to speak out.

Simon ultimately turned off comments on her official social media channels, which helped mitigate some of the daily abuse.

“I don’t think there are any easy answers,” she said about how to tackle targeted online abuse, “but I think we have to inspire one another and [build] a network of resilience.”

“I think the first thing is to speak up, and speak out,” she said, and to have allies who will listen.

“We should all be talking about it.”

Other panelists spoke about how they’ve been targeted with online abuse and the dangers they faced as some of it spilled over into their personal and professional lives offline.

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer and a prominent media voice during the COVID-19 pandemic, chose not to turn off her social media comments even after receiving racist abuse online.

She said she still doesn’t feel safe taking a cab by herself, after the negative experiences she’s had in being refused service.

Canada’s chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam discusses online abuse and building digital safety at the symposium Building a Safe and Respectful Digital World at Rideau Hall on Thursday. (Photo by Madalyn Howitt)

“We cannot tolerate hate. That’s not what Canada means,” she said.

Journalist Rachel Gilmore, who was subjected to a series of escalating death threats along with fellow female journalists Saba Eitizaz and Erica Ifill in a targeted hate campaign, said there needs to be a better understanding from newsrooms about how outrage that is organized and intended to be hurtful can quickly spiral online.

Her advice to other young journalists navigating hostile online spaces is to “not seek respect from people who do not respect your safety or your identity.”

2SLGBTQ+ activist and business owner Fae Johnstone, who has been the target of consistent anti-trans hate online, said she worries about the effect of social media on activism, when it can feel like it’s “crisis after crisis after crisis.”

“My worry is I’m getting tired,” she said, adding that young trans and queer people deserve to live in a healthy democracy that protects them.

Panelists also included TV host Kevin Raphaël, Indigenous content creator Santee Siouxx, MediaSmarts director of education Matthew Johnson, YWCA CEO Aline Nizigama, Virtual Guardians Foundation president François Savard, Centre for Newcomers president Anila Umar and Inuk artist and content creator Vanessa Brousseau, who posts as ResilientInuk online.

The panels were moderated by columnist and anti-racism advocate Emilie Nicolas.



11 Apr 2024 21:50:33

CBC North

New report slams RCMP treatment of homeless Indigenous women in Northwest Territories

Homeless Indigenous women in the North do not feel well-protected by the RCMP and instead face violence and discrimination by police, a new report from the Yellowknife Women's Society has found. ...
More ...Sign, trees.

Homeless Indigenous women in the North do not feel well-protected by the RCMP and instead face violence and discrimination by police, a new report from the Yellowknife Women's Society has found.

11 Apr 2024 21:37:11

CBC North

Hay River, N.W.T. gets new power distribution company after eight years

Hay River is getting a new power distribution company after the Northwest Territories Public Utilities Board approved the transfer from Northland Utilities to The Northwest Territories Power Corporati ...
More ...A blue office building with flags on top.

Hay River is getting a new power distribution company after the Northwest Territories Public Utilities Board approved the transfer from Northland Utilities to The Northwest Territories Power Corporation (NTPC) last month.

11 Apr 2024 21:15:32

CBC North

N.W.T. MLAs hold Missing Persons Act meetings in Aklavik and Inuvik

Over a dozen people came out in Inuvik on Wednesday night. Some people asked about historical cases of missing persons and how far back the legislature would allow RCMP to investigate. ...
More ...A row of people sit behind a table, one of them holding a microphone.

Over a dozen people came out in Inuvik on Wednesday night. Some people asked about historical cases of missing persons and how far back the legislature would allow RCMP to investigate.

11 Apr 2024 19:45:45

CBC North

Former manager of Whitehorse shelter questioned at inquest on low-barrier approach

The former manager of the Whitehorse emergency shelter was in the spotlight on Wednesday, at a coroner's inquest into the deaths of four women at the shelter in 2022 and 2023. ...
More ...A person walks in front of the doors of a Whitehorse shelter.

The former manager of the Whitehorse emergency shelter was in the spotlight on Wednesday, at a coroner's inquest into the deaths of four women at the shelter in 2022 and 2023.

11 Apr 2024 17:43:03

Nunatsiaq News

Nunavik MP calls out federal government over housing crisis

Nunavik’s representative in Parliament is calling out the federal government for its “disengagement” on housing over the past 30 years. Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou MP Sylv ...
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Nunavik’s representative in Parliament is calling out the federal government for its “disengagement” on housing over the past 30 years.

Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou MP Sylvie Bérubé said it’s “crucial” to understand that housing conditions in remote communities are not the same as the rest of Quebec, in a news release Wednesday.

The Bloc Québécois MP called for “specific and adapted” solutions for Nunavik, adding that more than one-third of the region’s population lives in overcrowded housing.

Denis Trudel, who represents the Longueuil—Saint-Hubert riding for the Bloc Québécois, toured the province last year to gain a broader picture of the current state of the housing crisis.

Bérubé’s news release is a response to Trudel’s report, also released Wednesday, which shows that the crisis is hitting hard in every region of the province.

Census data from Statistics Canada show that in 2021, nearly 18 per cent of homes in Nunavik had more than one person living in each room.

“The private housing market is nearly non-existent, combined with limited resources, it makes the housing crisis complex and difficult to solve,” Bérubé said of housing in Nunavik.

“The deplorable situation we live in now is a result of the disengagement of the federal government in matters of social housing in the last 30 years.”

Bérubé called on the federal government to restore financing, simplify housing programs and reduce bureaucratic barriers to housing construction.

Her news release includes 12 proposals from her party to solve the housing crisis in Quebec.

Among those proposals is a reduced interest rate on social housing construction and the establishment of an acquisition fund for social and community sectors.

 

11 Apr 2024 16:45:58

CBC North

Yukon officials concerned about possible spring flooding in Old Crow and Klondike Valley

Yukon government officials say the upcoming wildfire season is too far out to forecast, but potential flooding in Old Crow and the Klondike Valley are a major concern this spring. ...
More ...A wintery scene.

Yukon government officials say the upcoming wildfire season is too far out to forecast, but potential flooding in Old Crow and the Klondike Valley are a major concern this spring.

11 Apr 2024 16:00:00

CBC North

Tourism training program aims to empower Inuit to guide on Inuit land

A cruise expedition training program is working to bring more Inuit into leadership positions for trips showcasing Inuit land and culture.  ...
More ...People in lifejackets smile at camera.

A cruise expedition training program is working to bring more Inuit into leadership positions for trips showcasing Inuit land and culture. 

11 Apr 2024 16:00:00

CBC North

Yukon's orthopedic surgeons halting elective surgery referrals

The Whitehorse hospital’s orthopedic surgery unit has stopped taking new patients until further notice. ...
More ...A cream and green coloured building with a big letter H on it.

The Whitehorse hospital’s orthopedic surgery unit has stopped taking new patients until further notice.

11 Apr 2024 14:33:15

Nunatsiaq News

Nunavut education authorities to get more money for full-time office managers

The Nunavut government is increasing funding to district education authorities across the territory so they can employ office managers on a full-time basis. The government announced the change Tuesday ...
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The Nunavut government is increasing funding to district education authorities across the territory so they can employ office managers on a full-time basis.

The government announced the change Tuesday in a news release. The funding will come into effect in July.

A district education authority is locally elected body composed of community members responsible for the administration of schools in Nunavut.

Office managers help carry out the functions of the authority, including assisting parents with questions and issues, student travel, discipline, language programming and hiring school staff.

The Education Department currently only provides part-time funding for the authority to fill this role.

More money will help with staff retention, said Doug Workman, manager of policy and research for the Coalition of Nunavut District Education Authorities.

“The office manager responsibilities are immense, and for the last few years there’s been a really high turnover for part-time DEA office managers,” he said.

“People would do the best they can and they can only do so much when you’re getting paid for three hours a day when you’ve got kids to feed.”

Workman said he didn’t know how much more money the authorities can expect.

The Education Department didn’t include the figure in its release and didn’t immediately provide it when asked.

However, Workman said the extra money could lead to the enhancement of full-time benefits for those already employed or the hiring of extra workers to help on a casual basis.

Jedidah Merkosak, who chairs the coalition of DEAs, said the stability of the DEA workforce is important and will allow the authorities to “better meet their obligations and responsibilities” under the territorial Education Act.

 

11 Apr 2024 14:27:48

CBC North

Iqaluit churches upset after property tax bylaw leaves them in debt

The City of Iqaluit’s bylaw which requires religious and non-profit organizations to pay property taxes is not sitting well with two of the city’s churches. Now, one of them has created a petition ...
More ...A balding man wearing an orange shirt and grey pants sitting next to a woman wearing a purple t-shirt and jeans

The City of Iqaluit’s bylaw which requires religious and non-profit organizations to pay property taxes is not sitting well with two of the city’s churches. Now, one of them has created a petition to have the city repeal it.

11 Apr 2024 14:23:18

Nunatsiaq News

‘ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐊᑖᑕᐅᔪᖅ’ ᐱᕗᖅ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐃᑲᔪᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓴᕆᔭᐅᓂᕐᒥ ᐅᔭᒥᖓᓂ

For English version, see ‘Father of Nunavut’ receives Order of Canada medal ᐅᓪᓗᐊᓂ ᓄᓇᕗᑦ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒍᑎᖃᖅᖢᑎᒃ 25−ᖓᓂ ᓇᓪᓕᐅᓐᓂᖅᓱᐃᕐᓂᖓ ...
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For English version, see ‘Father of Nunavut’ receives Order of Canada medal

ᐅᓪᓗᐊᓂ ᓄᓇᕗᑦ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒍᑎᖃᖅᖢᑎᒃ 25−ᖓᓂ ᓇᓪᓕᐅᓐᓂᖅᓱᐃᕐᓂᖓᓂ, ᐊᑕᐅᓯᐅᔪᒥ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᓇᓂᓯᔨᐅᖃᑕᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᑖᑕᐅᔪᓂ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐃᑲᔪᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓴᕆᔭᐅᓂᕐᒥ ᐅᔭᒥᖓᓐᓂ ᐃᓄᑭᑦᑐᓂ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒍᑕᐅᔪᒥ.

ᔮᓐ ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᒃ ᐃᓕᔭᐅᓪᓚᕆᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐱᓕᕆᔨᐅᓪᓗᓂ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐃᑲᔪᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓴᕆᔭᐅᓂᕐᒥ ᑭᖕ ᑭᒡᒐᖅᑐᖅᑎᖓ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᒥᐊᕆ ᓴᐃᒪᓐᒧᑦ ᐃᖃᓗᖕᓂ ᐊᐃᑉᕆᓕ 3−ᒥ.

ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᒃ, 76, ᐊᑦᑎᖅᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐃᑲᔪᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓴᕆᔭᐅᓂᕐᒥ ᑎᓯᐱᕆ 2019−ᒥ ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒪᓂ-ᑯᐃᓐ ᑭᒡᒐᖅᑐᖅᑎᖓᓂ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᔫᓕ ᐸᐃᔭᑦᒧᑦ, ᑐᑭᖃᖅᖢᓂ ᐃᓕᔭᐅᓂᖓᓂ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒍᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᓄᑦ ᑎᓴᒪᓄᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᓪᓗᓂ.

ᓴᐃᒪᓐ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒍᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᓚᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᒃᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᐃᖃᓗᖕᓂ ᐃᓄᓕᒫᓄᑦ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᖁᕕᓱᐊᒍᑎᖃᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᓄᓇᕘᑉ 25−ᖓᓂ ᓇᓪᓕᐅᓐᓂᖅᓯᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂ.

ᐅᓂᒃᑳᕆᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᖕᒥ “ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐅᐱᒋᔭᐅᕐᔪᐊᕐᓂᖓᓂ.”

ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᒃ ᐃᓄᒃᔪᐊᖅ, ᓄᓇᕕᖕᒥᐅᑕᓪᓚᕆᐅᕗᖅ, ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᑕᐅᓯᐅᓪᓗᓂ ᐆᒪᔪᓐᓇᖅᓯᒪᔪᓂ ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᒥ ᓅᑎᑕᐅᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᓄᑦ, ᒐᕙᒪᑐᖃᒃᑯᑦ ᓅᑎᕆᓪᓗᑎᒃ ᐃᓄᖕᓂ ᐅᖓᓯᒃᑐᒧᑦ ᐅᐊᖕᓇᕐᒧᑦ ᖁᕝᕙᕆᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓂᕐᒥ ᑲᓇᑕᐅᑉ ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᒥ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᕐᓂᕆᔭᖓᓂ.

ᒪᕐᕈᐃᖅᓱᖅᖢᓂ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖑᓯᒪᕗᖅ ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᑕᐱᕇᑦ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ, ᑲᓇᑕᐅᑉ ᑲᑐᔾᔨᖃᑎᒌᖕᓂᖓ ᐃᓄᖕᓄᑦ, ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒪᓂ ᑕᐃᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ Inuit Tapirisat of Canada−ᒥ.

ᐊᕐᕌᒍᓂ 6−ᓂ ᕿᑎᐊᓂ ᐊᑎᓕᐅᕆᓂᕐᒥ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐊᖏᕈᑕᐅᔪᒥ 1993−ᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᕕᖕᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓄᓇᑦᓯᐊᕐᒥ 1999−ᒥ, ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᒃ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖑᓪᓗᓂ ᑲᒥᓴᓇᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐊᑐᓕᖅᑎᑕᐅᓂᕐᒥ ᑲᑎᒪᔨᐅᔪᓄᑦ.

ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᒃ ᓯᕗᓂᐊᓂ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᓯᒪᕗᖅ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐃᑲᔪᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓴᕆᔭᐅᓂᕐᒥ 2014−ᒥ.

ᑎᑎᕋᖅᐸᓚᐅᖅᓯᒪᒋᕗᖅ ᓄᓇᑦᓯᐊᖅ ᑐᓴᒐᒃᓴᓕᕆᔨᒃᑯᓐᓄᑦ ᑎᕆᖅᑯᑯᓗᒐ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᑕᐅᓂᐅᕙᒃᑐᒥ ᖃᔅᓯᒐᓚᖕᓄᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᓄᑦ.

ᐊᐱᖅᓱᖅᑕᐅᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᓴᐃᒪᓐ ᐅᖃᓪᓚᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᓯᐊᒎᖅᑐᒥ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒍᑕᐅᔪᒥ ᐃᓚᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᖕᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓚᖏᓐᓂ, ᐱᓗᐊᖅᑐᒥ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᓚᐅᕐᒪᑦ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖃᕐᕕᖓᓂ ᓄᓇᕘᑉ ᓇᓪᓕᐅᖅᓯᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᐅᓪᓗᖓᓂ.

“ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᐱᒻᒪᕆᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ, ᔮᓐ ᐱᓕᕆᖃᑎᒋᕙᓚᐅᕋᒃᑯ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖃᑎᒋᕙᓚᐅᖅᖢᒍ ᐊᒥᓱᐊᓗᖕᓄᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᓄᑦ,” ᓴᐃᒪᓐ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᐱᖅᓱᖅᑕᐅᓂᐅᔪᒥ.

“ᖃᔅᓯᒐᓚᖕᓂ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᔭᐅᕐᔪᐊᖅᑐᓂ ᐃᓄᖕᓂ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐃᓚᐅᖃᑕᐅᓂᑦᑎᓐᓂ ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒥᖓ [ᓄᓇᑖᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒥ ᐋᔩᖃᑎᒌᖕᓂᐅᔪᒥ] ᐱᓕᕆᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᐅᓪᓗᓂ ᐱᔾᔪᑎᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᔮᓐ ᐊᒪᕈᐊᓕᖕᒥ.”

11 Apr 2024 13:30:45

CBC North

Board approves emergency plan to prevent tailings spill at Yukon's Mount Nansen mine site

The Yukon Water Board has approved a plan that's meant to reduce the risk of a catastrophic tailings spill this spring at the abandoned Mount Nansen mine site in the central territory. ...
More ...A frozen pond is seen in a snowy landscape.

The Yukon Water Board has approved a plan that's meant to reduce the risk of a catastrophic tailings spill this spring at the abandoned Mount Nansen mine site in the central territory.

11 Apr 2024 13:27:40

Nunatsiaq News

GN, federal housing programs ‘could work in tandem,’ Fraser says

During and after the Second World War, Canada faced a housing crunch. Soldiers were returning home and starting families, but had few options to find a place to live. In response, the Crown corporatio ...
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During and after the Second World War, Canada faced a housing crunch. Soldiers were returning home and starting families, but had few options to find a place to live.

In response, the Crown corporation Wartime Housing Ltd. created a catalogue of homes designed to be cost-effective and easy to construct.

The designs were “pre-approved” and therefore avoided much of the usual red tape involved in building a house. Canadians who used these standard “strawberry box” or “victory” home designs avoided mountains of paperwork, architecture fees and high material costs.

Now, the federal government wants to borrow that framework for a modern version of the wartime catalogue to address the country’s current housing shortfall.

“This is not the complete solution, but it’s a big part of it,” Sean Fraser, Canada’s housing and infrastructure minister, said in an interview.

Since January, Fraser and his team have hosted virtual consultations with architects and territorial, provincial and municipal government representatives, among others, to discuss the best way to design the program.

Fraser announced Ottawa’s new catalogue program in December, just was as Nunavut Housing Corp. was finalizing a new set of housing initiatives, including a revamped Homeownership Assistance Program, or HAP.

The Nunavut Housing Corporation announced its plan — including what’s known as HAP 2.0 — on Monday.

Although the federal and territorial programs may sound similar, HAP — which ran in the Northwest Territories from 1983 to 1992 — and the federal program aren’t the same.

“They would be able to operate in a complementary way, but they serve a different purpose,” Fraser said.

HAP traded home ownership for sweat equity. Eligible residents could pick a home in a catalogue, receive the materials for free, and build the house themselves.

In March 2023, Nunatsiaq News published Our Home, a four-part series that examined the program’s pros and cons, alongside the challenges of reviving it. (The series has been nominated for a National News Award.)

Inuit, researchers and construction industry workers called HAP an affordable way to provide quality housing. They also said it was an empowering program that increased community pride, alleviated the public housing demand and made home ownership easier to attain.

Last October, Nunavut’s Housing Minister Lorne Kusugak said Nunavut Housing Corp. was “looking at creating a new Homeownership Assistance Program 2.0.”

That new program will offer forgivable $250,000 loans over 10 years toward the purchase of a materials package with a one-year residency requirement.

Further assistance could include project management or supervision, financial counselling, and training.

“Clients will present a plan for building where they identify the component of construction they undertake themselves or will receive help from family and friends,” its website said.

The federal catalogue provides designs for a standardized home and multiplexes, whereas the original HAP provided designs and materials free of charge.

“Our program is about efficiency [and] less about directly investing in the construction of new homes,” Fraser said. “The two could work in tandem.”

One area Fraser said the government will look to pin down during consultations is regional variances.

“If we work closely with the housing corporation in the territory, for example, and incorporate elements of design that could be produced en masse … we would be able to reduce the overall cost of building.”

The two governments have not yet met to see how the program might operate in Nunavut, according to Nunavut Housing Corp. spokesperson Sierra LeBlanc.

A lack of infrastructure, higher construction costs, a harsher climate: there are several stipulations the housing corporation and Fraser would have to work through, she said.

“Beyond these challenges,” LeBlanc wrote, “it’s important that homes built in Nunavut are culturally adequate and suitable and take into consideration factors such as family size or space to accommodate harvesting needs.”

Infrastructure Canada plans to announce findings from its consultation process in late spring and release the first iteration of the catalogue late this year.

 

11 Apr 2024 12:30:58

Cabin Radio

‘Not even a sound.’ Silent waterfall encapsulates NWT’s low water

Generations of Dene in Kakisa know the thunderous sound of Náįlįcho, or Lady Evelyn Falls. Right now, it's silent, unsettling Elders for whom this is home. The post ‘Not even a sound.’ Silent w ...
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Generations of Dene in Kakisa know the thunderous sound of Náįlįcho, or Lady Evelyn Falls. Right now, it's silent, unsettling Elders for whom this is home.

The post ‘Not even a sound.’ Silent waterfall encapsulates NWT’s low water first appeared on Cabin Radio.

11 Apr 2024 12:01:00

Cabin Radio

Lodge takes Parks Canada to court over licence in Thaıdene Nëné

A court case involving a lodge's bid to operate inside Thaıdene Nëné asks a judge to decide if Parks Canada's new approach to reconciliation is legally sound. The post Lodge takes Parks Canada to c ...
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A court case involving a lodge's bid to operate inside Thaıdene Nëné asks a judge to decide if Parks Canada's new approach to reconciliation is legally sound.

The post Lodge takes Parks Canada to court over licence in Thaıdene Nëné first appeared on Cabin Radio.

11 Apr 2024 11:57:00

Cabin Radio

Ottawa invests $5M in Dene-owned Camsell River mine project

In a week where the post-diamonds NWT economy is under scrutiny, the federal government gave an early-stage Dene-led project near Great Bear Lake $5 million. The post Ottawa invests $5M in Dene-owned ...
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In a week where the post-diamonds NWT economy is under scrutiny, the federal government gave an early-stage Dene-led project near Great Bear Lake $5 million.

The post Ottawa invests $5M in Dene-owned Camsell River mine project first appeared on Cabin Radio.

11 Apr 2024 11:55:00

Cabin Radio

Olympian returns to Yellowknife for ‘ski playground’

Two-time Olympian Jesse Cockney, who grew up on Yellowknife's cross-country ski trails, is back to help people try everything from biathlon to ski jump. The post Olympian returns to Yellowknife for � ...
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Two-time Olympian Jesse Cockney, who grew up on Yellowknife's cross-country ski trails, is back to help people try everything from biathlon to ski jump.

The post Olympian returns to Yellowknife for ‘ski playground’ first appeared on Cabin Radio.

11 Apr 2024 11:40:00

CBC North

Yukon couple, married 75 years, now forced to live apart because Watson Lake has no long-term care options

Lloyd Kostiuck, 99, and his wife Evelyn, 95, have been mostly inseparable through their 75 years of marriage. But now Evelyn is in a long-term care home in Whitehorse, several hours away from Lloyd wh ...
More ...An elderly couple sitting beside each other.

Lloyd Kostiuck, 99, and his wife Evelyn, 95, have been mostly inseparable through their 75 years of marriage. But now Evelyn is in a long-term care home in Whitehorse, several hours away from Lloyd who's back home in Watson Lake.

11 Apr 2024 08:00:00

CBC North

This Fort Smith couple fell in love over flowers. The community just threw them a wedding

Though the pair have been together for eight years, Moberly said it was only recently when Salfi surprised him by popping the question one afternoon.  ...
More ...Two men, one in a grey sweater and one in a blue jacket, pose for a photo with one of the men resting his head on the other's shoulder.

Though the pair have been together for eight years, Moberly said it was only recently when Salfi surprised him by popping the question one afternoon. 

11 Apr 2024 08:00:00

CBC North

Yukon court dismisses appeal of decision to quash exploration project in Beaver River watershed

The Yukon Court of Appeal has dismissed an appeal from the Yukon government to reinstate a mineral exploration project in the Beaver River watershed. ...
More ...Black letters reading THE LAW COURTS PALAIS DE JUSTICE are mounted on large white tiles on the side of a building next to the Yukon territorial logo

The Yukon Court of Appeal has dismissed an appeal from the Yukon government to reinstate a mineral exploration project in the Beaver River watershed.

10 Apr 2024 23:33:29

CBC North

For 1st time, you can reserve sites at some Yukon campgrounds

A new online reservation system for four Yukon campgrounds opened Wednesday morning. The government says it's a two-year pilot project aimed at helping people better plan their camping trips in advanc ...
More ...A fire pit, stack of firewood and picnic table are seen on an empty campsite.

A new online reservation system for four Yukon campgrounds opened Wednesday morning. The government says it's a two-year pilot project aimed at helping people better plan their camping trips in advance.  

10 Apr 2024 21:42:06

CBC North

Sahtu Secretariat hopeful new defence spending can push ahead Mackenzie Valley Highway

The Sahtu Secretariat Incorporated is hoping the federal government’s new policy on Arctic security can result in progress on the long-awaited Mackenzie Valley Highway.  ...
More ...A man with a black ballcap, black coat and dress shirt looks into the camera. He's in an auditorium.

The Sahtu Secretariat Incorporated is hoping the federal government’s new policy on Arctic security can result in progress on the long-awaited Mackenzie Valley Highway. 

10 Apr 2024 21:39:05

Nunatsiaq News

Health advisory issued over whooping cough outbreak in Kivalliq

With an ongoing outbreak of whooping cough in the Kivalliq region,  Nunavut’s Health Department is urging people to take steps to protect themselves. The outbreak was declared March 7, with act ...
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With an ongoing outbreak of whooping cough in the Kivalliq region,  Nunavut’s Health Department is urging people to take steps to protect themselves.

The outbreak was declared March 7, with active cases in Arviat and Rankin Inlet.

The throat and lung illness spreads easily and is most severe for children under the age of one, according to a public health advisory issued Tuesday.

Symptoms include coughing followed by an unusual “whoop” sound, difficulty breathing, vomiting, and a high fever that lasts more than three days.

To avoid whooping cough — also known as pertussis — the department urged people to get vaccinated, wash their hands often, cough into a sleeve or tissue, and not to share food, drinks or toothbrushes.

People with symptoms should contact their health centre. More information on whooping cough is available on the Department of Health’s webpage.

The Department has not said how many cases of whooping cough have been confirmed during the outbreak. It did not respond to a request for more information this week.

 

10 Apr 2024 21:17:32

Nunatsiaq News

Kugluktuk health centre reports syphilis ‘outbreak’ in community

Kugluktuk is experiencing an outbreak of the sexually transmitted infection syphilis, according to a Facebook post from the community’s health centre dated April 7. The post encourages people who ha ...
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Kugluktuk is experiencing an outbreak of the sexually transmitted infection syphilis, according to a Facebook post from the community’s health centre dated April 7.

The post encourages people who have symptoms, think they have been exposed, or have had unprotected sex to be tested and to seek treatment.

“Kugluktuk has the highest case in all over Kitikmeot,” the post read.

“Having the test, treatment and practising safe sex [through] condom use will keep our community protected.”

Syphilis symptoms may include sores, rashes, swollen lymph nodes, fever or feeling unwell, according to a Government of Nunavut fact sheet.

If left untreated, syphilis may cause future health problems including blindness, paralysis, heart damage or death.

As syphilis is transmitted through unprotected sex, a GN fact sheet encourages people to reduce the number of sexual partners they have and to use condoms, which can be picked up for free at every health centre.

It’s not clear how many cases of syphilis have been reported in Kugluktuk. Nunavut’s chief public health officer was not available Wednesday to comment on the outbreak.

The post from the Kugluktuk health centre urged people not to feel shy about calling for an appointment, and said their confidentiality will be respected.

“You will speak directly to one of the nurses and we will respect your privacy,” the post says.

Kugluktuk residents can phone 867-982-2689 to book an appointment with the health centre, Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

10 Apr 2024 21:09:06

Nunatsiaq News

‘Rough, tough’ Whale Cove Race was a winner, organizer says

One snowmobile caught fire, there were a couple of crashes and lots of high adrenaline. And amid the chaos, a fun and successful Whale Cove Race was held for the second straight year. “[It was] noth ...
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One snowmobile caught fire, there were a couple of crashes and lots of high adrenaline. And amid the chaos, a fun and successful Whale Cove Race was held for the second straight year.

“[It was] nothing but positive,” race organizer Noel Kaludjak said of the response to this year’s event on April 7, which saw snowmobilers race from Rankin Inlet to Whale Cove and back — a distance of 136 kilometres.

Last year’s race was a bit of a trial run, Kaludjak said, since it was the first time it had been run since 1978.

But this year, the race took a jump in popularity and the number of competitors jumped too, up to 34 compared to 13 last year.

Racers flew in from different Nunavut communities to participate. One person born and raised in Nunavut but now living in Toronto made it to Rankin Inlet to take part.

The race was over ice-covered sea and land, with rocky areas that created obstacles for racers.

“It’s a rough race, it’s a tough race,” Kaludjak said.

Volunteers organizing the race were prepared for any challenges and their work improved the safety of the race, he said.

That need for safety was tested.

At the halfway pit stop in Whale Cove, one racer’s snowmobile caught fire. Fortunately, there were fire extinguishers nearby.

“It was put out in an instant,” Kaludjak said, and the driver was able to run the second half and finish the race.

There were a couple of crashes during the race but nothing serious, he added. One racer had to go to hospital but was released after a couple of hours.

Five checkpoints were set up, with a Starlink dish connected at one of the checkpoints to keep organizers connected with the racers who each carried an inReach device for satellite communication and SOS calls.

As well, a helicopter monitoring the race from the air carried an Inuk pilot, a medic and Kaludjak himself, who was filming the race live to stream on Facebook.

He said making it a safe race made it “a lot more fun for the fans.”

“Everybody knew exactly where [each racer] was and how they were doing,” he said.

Just like last year, the race included a staggered start beginning at 1 p.m. Two snowmobiles at a time took off, with a 30-second interval between pairs.

The winner was determined by best time.

Nanauk Tanuyak, from Rankin Inlet, won the race with a time of one hour, 21 minutes and one second, and claimed the $15,000 first prize. Arsene Karlik finished second in one hour, 23 minutes and 28 seconds, and collected $12,000, while Tristen Dias came third with a time of one hour, 25 minutes and 48 seconds, earning $10,000.

“It was a nailbiter, everyone was on the edge of their seats,” Kaludjak said.

The race was originally run between 1975 to 1978 but was put on hold for more than 40 years due to issues like funding, lack of volunteers and safety concerns.

Those issues were all addressed and Kaludjak said the plan is to have an even bigger race next year.

 

10 Apr 2024 20:38:32

Cabin Radio

NWT using infrared scanners to find overwintering fires

Aerial infrared scans will be used to find NWT wildfires that burned through the winter. Here's the latest fire outlook and a guide to what else is being done. The post NWT using infrared scanners to ...
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Aerial infrared scans will be used to find NWT wildfires that burned through the winter. Here's the latest fire outlook and a guide to what else is being done.

The post NWT using infrared scanners to find overwintering fires first appeared on Cabin Radio.

10 Apr 2024 20:12:54

Nunatsiaq News

Housing corporation offers ‘bold new approach’ to spur construction

A plan to spur homebuilding across the territory through financial incentives has been unveiled by Nunavut Housing Corp. The housing corporation revealed details of its new Nunavut Affordable Housing ...
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A plan to spur homebuilding across the territory through financial incentives has been unveiled by Nunavut Housing Corp.

The housing corporation revealed details of its new Nunavut Affordable Housing Supply Initiative, or NAHSI, “flagship” affordable housing program, in a news release Monday.

As an incentive to get more units built for rent or sale, 10-year forgivable loans of $150,000 for each eligible unit will be made available.

That includes single-family homes, multiplexes, condominiums, modular homes and co-operatives. Inuit organizations, private developers and builders, municipalities and non-profit groups are eligible to apply.

Lorne Kusugak, minister responsible for the Nunavut Housing Corp., called NAHSI a “bold new approach to bridge the affordable housing gap” in the news release.

“NAHSI provides builders and developers with financial support to accelerate the supply of affordable rental and homeownership units,” he said.

“The modernized suite of homeownership programs responds to what we heard from Nunavummiut.”

Applications for NAHSI are being accepted now, the corporation said, while applications for related support programs will open “in the coming months.”

The corporation defined affordable housing as units for rent or purchase available for at least 20 per cent below market rates.

It said for existing properties, enhanced repair programs will broaden the eligibility for assistance and offer higher levels of funding. Also, more help for down payments will be available.

In its release, the corporation said NAHSI will complement its existing home ownership support programs, including what it refers to as HAP 2.0 — a revival of a program it ran between 30 and 40 years ago.

The housing corporation has rolled out an updated version of the original HAP — or Homeownership Assistance Program — which was offered in Northwest Territories from 1983 through 1992.

HAP allowed residents to select a home design from a catalogue and provided the materials free for eligible residents to build the home themselves.

It was popular among Inuit, construction industry workers and researchers who called it an affordable way to provide new housing.

According to the housing corporation’s website, HAP 2.0 offers $250,000 forgivable loans over 10 years toward the purchase of a materials package, with a one-year residency requirement.

Applications open for these programs in summer, according to the housing corporation website.

10 Apr 2024 18:21:57

CBC North

Lodge owners in northern B.C. ask for help to recover stolen trailers

The owners of an Alaska Highway lodge in Pink Mountain, B.C., are devastated by a recent theft and are hoping Yukoners might help them recover the stolen property: two large mobile trailers.   ...
More ...The exterior of a mobile trailer

The owners of an Alaska Highway lodge in Pink Mountain, B.C., are devastated by a recent theft and are hoping Yukoners might help them recover the stolen property: two large mobile trailers.  

10 Apr 2024 17:31:31

CBC North

Whitehorse shelter had no clear policy for handling overdoses, inquest hears

Staff members who were working at the Whitehorse emergency shelter the night two women died there in 2022 told an inquest jury on Tuesday that at the time, there was no clear policy or training for st ...
More ...Photo of whitehorse emergency shelter, snow on the ground, two cars driving in opposite directions.

Staff members who were working at the Whitehorse emergency shelter the night two women died there in 2022 told an inquest jury on Tuesday that at the time, there was no clear policy or training for staff to deal with overdoses or monitor intoxicated guests.

10 Apr 2024 16:46:57

Nunatsiaq News

Arctic Fresh ᐃᒃᓯᓐᓇᐃᕗᖅ ᐃᖃᓗᖕᓂ-ᓴᓂᑭᓗᐊᕐᒧᑦ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᔨᑦᑎᕋᕐᓂᕐᒥ

For English version, see Arctic Fresh scraps Iqaluit-Sanikiluaq flight service ᑕᐃᒪᐃᒐᔪᒃᑐᒥ ᓂᐅᕕᐊᒃᓴᐅᕙᒃᑐᓄᑦ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᖃᔾᔮᕈᓐᓃᖅᐳᖅ ᐅᕙᙵᑦ � ...
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For English version, see Arctic Fresh scraps Iqaluit-Sanikiluaq flight service

ᑕᐃᒪᐃᒐᔪᒃᑐᒥ ᓂᐅᕕᐊᒃᓴᐅᕙᒃᑐᓄᑦ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᖃᔾᔮᕈᓐᓃᖅᐳᖅ ᐅᕙᙵᑦ ᓄᓇᕘᑉ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖃᕐᕕᖓᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓄᓇᕘᑉ ᓂᒋᖅᐸᓯᖓᓃᓛᖑᔪᒥ ᓄᓇᓕᐅᔪᒧᑦ.

Arctic Fresh ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒥ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕈᓰᑦ ᒪᕐᕉᖕᓂ ᐊᓂᒍᖅᓯᒪᓕᖅᑐᓂ ᓄᖅᑲᖅᑎᑦᑎᓂᖏᓐᓂ ᑲᖓᑕᓲᖑᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐃᖃᓗᖕᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓴᓂᑭᓗᐊᕐᒧᑦ, ᕿᑭᖅᑕᒥ ᕼᐋᒻᓚᐅᔪᖅ ᐃᓄᒋᐊᖕᓂᖃᖅᖢᓂ 1,000−ᓂ ᓂᒋᖅᐸᓯᐊᓂ ᐃᓱᐊᓂ ᑲᖏᖅᓱᐊᓗᖕᒥ, ᒫᔾᔨ 31−ᒥ ᐃᓱᖃᕐᓗᓂ.

ᑐᓴᒐᒃᓴᓕᐊᖑᔪᒥ, ᑲᒻᐸᓂ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐱᓕᕆᓯᒪᓂᖏᓐᓂ “ᐊᖏᔪᐊᓗᖕᒥ ᑮᓇᐅᔭᓂ ᔭᒐᐃᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᐅᓚᑕᐅᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᐆᒥᖓ ᖃᖓᑕᖃᑦᑕᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ” 2023−ᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ 2024−ᒥ.

ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᒐᕙᒪᒃᑯᑦ ᓯᕗᓂᐊᓂ ᐃᑲᔫᓯᖅᓯᕙᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᓯᕗᓪᓕᖅᐹᒥᒃ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᕆᔭᐅᔪᒥᒃ ᑐᕌᖓᓂᖃᖅᑐᓄᑦ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᐃᓱᒪᓕᐅᕆᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᓄᑖᙳᕆᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᔾᔮᙱᓐᓂᖏᓐᓂ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒥ ᔭᓄᐊᕆ 2023−ᖑᑎᓪᓗᒍ.

“ᓈᒻᒪᒋᓚᐅᙱᓐᓇᒃᑯ ᓄᖅᑲᖅᑎᑦᑎᓂᕐᒥ ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒥᖓ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᐅᔪᒥ. ᐃᑲᔪᖅᓱᐃᖏᓐᓇᕈᒪᓚᐅᖅᐳᒍᑦ ᓴᓂᑭᓗᐊᕐᒥ, ᑕᐃᒫᒃ ᑲᔪᓯᑎᑦᑎᓚᐅᖅᐳᒍᑦ ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒧᖓ ᐊᖅᑯᑕᐅᔪᒥ,” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᕋᐃᔭᓐ ᕼᐋᒋᓐ, ᑐᑭᒧᐊᒃᑎᑦᑎᔨᐅᔪᖅ Arctic Fresh ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ.

Arctic Fresh ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑏᓐᓇᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᐱᓪᓗᑎᒃ ᑮᓇᐅᔭᓂ ᔭᒐᐃᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐅᓄᕐᓂᖅᓴᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᑕᖅᑭᓄᑦ 15−ᓄᑦ, ᕼᐋᒋᓐ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ, ᐃᓚᒋᐊᖅᓯᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑲᒻᐸᓂ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑏᓐᓇᕈᒪᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᔭᒐᐃᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᕈᓐᓇᙱᒻᒪᔾᔪᒃ ᑕᐅᕗᖓᓕᒫᖅ.

ᕼᐋᒋᓐ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᒐᕙᒪᒃᑯᑦ ᓯᕗᓂᐊᓂ ᐃᑲᔫᓯᖃᑦᑕᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒧᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓇᑉᐸᖓᓂ ᑕᐃᑲᓂ ᓄᕙᒡᔪᐊᕐᓇᖅ-19 ᐊᒥᓱᓂ ᖃᓂᒪᓐᓇᐅᔪᒥ, ᖃᖓᑕᓂᕐᒥ ᐊᔪᕐᓇᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᓂᕐᒧᑦ.

ᑐᕌᖓᓂᓕᖕᒥ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᖃᕐᓇᓂ ᓴᓂᑭᓗᐊᕐᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᖃᓗᖕᓄᑦ, ᐃᑭᒪᔪᑦ ᐊᐅᓪᓛᕆᐊᖃᖅᐳᑦ ᐋᑐᕚᑎᒍᑦ, ᒪᓐᑐᕆᐋᓪ ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᐅᐃᓂᐱᐊᒡᑯᑦ ᑲᓱᖃᑎᖃᕐᓂᕐᒥ ᐊᓯᖏᓐᓂ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᓄᓇᓕᐅᔪᓄᑦ

“ᑭᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅ ᑕᐃᑯᖓ ᐊᐅᓪᓛᖅᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᐅᔾᔨᕆᕗᖅ ᑖᔅᓱᒥᖓ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᖃᙱᓪᓗᓂ, ᐊᐅᓪᓛᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᑭᓕᒐᒃᓴᑎᑦ ᓴᓂᑭᓗᐊᕐᒧᑦ ᐱᖓᓱᐃᓪᓚᐅᖅᑐᓂ ᐊᑭᑦᑐᕆᐊᕐᓂᐊᖅᐳᑦ,” ᕼᐋᒋᓐ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ.

“ᓂᕆᐅᒃᐳᒍᑦ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᒐᕙᒪᒃᑯᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓄᓇᓕᖕᓂ ᒐᕙᒪᐅᔪᑦ ᐅᖃᖃᑎᒌᖕᓂᐊᖅᐳᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓇᓂᓯᓗᑕ ᐱᓕᕆᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐆᒥᖓ ᐊᖅᑯᑕᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᕈᖅᑎᑕᐅᒃᑲᓐᓂᕐᓂᖓᓂ.”

ᐃᑲᕐᕋᓂ 2.5-ᓂ, 8-ᓂ-ᐃᒃᓯᕙᐅᑕᓕᒃ ᑐᕌᖓᓂᖃᖅᑐᒥ ᖃᖓᑕᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᐅᓚᑉᐸᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᑕᐊᓯᐊᖅᑐᒥ ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕈᓯᐅᔪᒥ, ᕿᑎᖅᑰᒥ.

ᐃᓱᒪᒋᓇᒍ ᓄᖅᑲᖅᑎᑕᐅᓂᖓᓂ ᓂᐅᕕᕐᕕᒐᓚᖕᓄᑦ ᐱᔨᑦᑎᕋᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᑲᒻᐸᓂ ᓱᓕ ᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᐅᕗᖅ ᓵᑕᒧᑦ ᐱᔨᑦᑎᕋᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᐃᑯᖓ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑕᐃᑲᙵᑦ ᓴᓂᑭᓗᐊᕐᒧᑦ, ᕼᐋᒋᓐ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ.

10 Apr 2024 16:13:44

CBC North

Language commissioner wants review of N.W.T. legislation, says her role is restrictive

Language commissioner says role is restrictive and advocates for access to Indigenous language services. ...
More ...portrait of a woman

Language commissioner says role is restrictive and advocates for access to Indigenous language services.

10 Apr 2024 15:19:26

Nunatsiaq News

Northern newspapers face changes

The North’s media landscape is seeing shakeups that have affected outlets in all three territories. Yukon could be losing a legacy newspaper after the Whitehorse Star announced April 5 it would soon ...
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The North’s media landscape is seeing shakeups that have affected outlets in all three territories.

Yukon could be losing a legacy newspaper after the Whitehorse Star announced April 5 it would soon print its final edition after 124 years in business.

But it’s possible all is not lost. A group of investors has come forward, with the help of community fundraising efforts, with a last-ditch offer to buy the Whitehorse Star, according to editor Jim Butler in an interview Tuesday with CBC’s The Current.

Black Press Media, which owns newspaper group NNSL Media that publishes Nunavut News and Kivalliq News in Nunavut, is carrying on under new Canadian ownership.

The media company announced late last month it had finalized a sale and wrapped up its creditor protection process in the Supreme Court of British Columbia and its related U.S. proceedings.

The company, which also publishes papers in Northwest Territories and many other local newspapers across the country, will remain Canadian-controlled, with its head office based in Surrey, B.C.

The new ownership group includes Canadian institutional investors Canso Investment Counsel and Deans Knight Capital Management, as well as local media company Carpenter Media Group.

Meanwhile, Nunatsiaq News is looking for a new Iqaluit office after its previous office was destroyed in a fire March 26.

The newspaper had been located at its 157 Nipisa St. location for more than 20 years.

 

10 Apr 2024 12:30:08

Cabin Radio

After eight years, Hay River power franchise sale gets green light

In a process that's taken an eternity, NTPC is at last set to take over Hay River's power distribution from Northland. But we're not over the finish line yet. The post After eight years, Hay River pow ...
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In a process that's taken an eternity, NTPC is at last set to take over Hay River's power distribution from Northland. But we're not over the finish line yet.

The post After eight years, Hay River power franchise sale gets green light first appeared on Cabin Radio.

10 Apr 2024 12:02:00

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